How did ECTS develop?

ECTS was introduced in 1989, within the framework of Erasmus, now part of the Socrates programme. ECTS is the only credit system which has been successfully tested and used across Europe. ECTS was set up initially for credit transfer. The system facilitated the recognition of periods of study abroad and thus enhanced the quality and volume of student mobility in Europe. Recently ECTS is developing into an accumulation system to be implemented at institutional, regional, national and European level. This is one of the key objectives of the Bologna Declaration of June 1999. Students participating in ECTS will receive full credit for all academic work successfully carried out at any ECTS partner institution. Students are able to transfer these academic credits from one participating institution to another as long as there is prior agreement between the institutions involved.

Why introduce ECTS?

ECTS makes study programmes easy to read and compare for all students, local and foreign. ECTS facilitates mobility and academic recognition. ECTS helps universities to organise and revise their study programmes. ECTS can be used across a variety of programmes and modes of delivery. ECTS makes European higher education more attractive for students from other continents.

Application deadline 15th of May 2018

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To the Spanish course



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Master theses 2014 and 2015

Find all Master Theses abstracts 2014 and 2015 online

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